Several months ago, I heard my daughter and her third-grade friends discuss the “recess friendship monitors” at school. When I asked what that meant, they explained that each of them took turns being a monitor during recess to make sure the other girls were getting along. When an issue arose, the “monitor” was called in to resolve conflict.

Even though their friendship-monitor plan fizzled out after only a few weeks, I was impressed by the maturity behind their actions. They already understood that even the closest of friends can have a falling out and that sometimes people need help from an outside source.

Cute and sweet, isn’t it? At least as far as eight-year-old girls are concerned. But what about when conflict involves adults?

Adults should be above childish behavior and fights that involve “she said, he said,” right? Sadly, most of us are not. At least, I’m not.

Just yesterday, I told my husband as we were heading for church service that I was still upset with a friend for something that had happened recently. Hubby didn’t say much, but the pastor had plenty to say on the subject. …

I did some deep soul-searching that morning. I had felt justified in my anger toward this particular person because it involved my daughter getting hurt emotionally. I had rationalized that I was protecting my “baby” from getting hurt. Sure, I could try to rise above something done to me, but to my baby? Look out because mother bear is on the loose.

Yet … I started thinking about what Jesus did on the cross. He took on the sins of the entire world, including mine. It would be selfish of me not to forgive someone else for his or her mistakes when Jesus paid such a high price for my own. And what about God the Father? In essence, sin necessitated the sacrifice of Jesus on the cross, and my sin was part of that. So, I was a part of what happened to Jesus, God’s son. But God doesn’t hold that against me. Therefore, my anger regarding a minor offense against my daughter makes me a hypocrite, does it not? If I depend on God’s forgiveness through Jesus, I must extend that same forgiveness to others.

Maturity — it’s not for wimps.

I wish for you all to have a day filled with forgiveness!